Tokyo Photo Night–Kazuyoshi Nomachi, Apr. 5, 2004

Next Tokyo Photo Night

An invitation to the Tokyo photo community and friends!

Date: Monday, April 5, 2004

The next viewing of the Tokyo Photo Night series, a community slide show event featuring top photographic talent from Japan and abroad will be held on Monday, April 5, 2004, at The Foreign Correspondents’ Club of Japan in Yurakucho. This time TPN is pleased to be showing the work of:

Kazuyoshi Nomachi:
“Prayers of the Earth”

During his long career, documentary photographer Kazuyoshi Nomachi has photographed cultures and civilizations the world over. Known for his dedication to his craft, Nomachi immerses himself into any subject he photographs through exhaustive research and field work. The author of several books, Nomachi has published titles internationally in five languages, including; The Sinai, The Nile, Tibet, Mecca, Medina, The Sahara and Ethiopia, as well as his Japanese titles, The Long March, Great Rift Valley, and The Vatican. He has been published in National Geographic, Stern, Geo, Life, and is represented by the Tokyo photo agency Pacific Press Images. Nomachi is also the recipient of many awards including; the Ken Domon Award in 1984, the Arts Encouragement Prize from Japan’s Education Ministry in 1990, the Kodansha Cultural Award for Photography in 1993, and the Annual Award 1997 from the Photographic Society of Japan.

Nomachi’s latest project, Prayers of the Earth, a retrospective of the world’s major religions photographed over the past thirty years will be exhibited at the Tokyo Metropolitan Museum of Photography from March 30, 2004. Tokyo Photo Night is pleased to have Mr. Nomachi show his photographs in conjunction with this exhibition as well as talk about his illustrious career.

Date: Monday, April 5, 2004

Times:
– Buffet dinner: 6:15 p.m. – 7:00 p.m. (price ∞Q100 tax included, reservations are required. Please call the FCCJ front desk by April 3, 2004 to make your reservation ).

– Nomachi’s presentation: 7:00 p.m. – 8:30 p.m. (free).

– This event is open to the public, you do not need to be a member of the FCCJ to attend. Beverages and cocktails will be available.

Where:
The Foreign Correspondents’ Club of Japan
Yurakucho Denki North Building 20F
Yurakucho 1-7-1
Tokyo-to, Chiyoda-ku
tel: 03-3211-3161

Subway/JR: exit either Hibiya Station (Hibiya, Chiyoda, Mita and Yurakucho lines – exits A3 & A2), or Yurakucho Station (Yamanote and Keihin Tohoku lines). The A3 exit at Hibiya station comes up in the basement of the club. Head toward the elevator bank for the North Building (Kita-kan) and take the elevator to the 20th Floor. Other nearby stations are Ginza, Uchisaiwaicho, Tokyo and Otemachi, all are within walking distance. Parking is also available in the Yurakucho Denki Building basement (at half price if the parking stub is stamped by the reception desk).

Tokyo Photo Night Website:

Check out the Tokyo Photo Night WEBSITE!
http://www2.gol.com/users/tbcam/tpn.html

Here you can view a sample of Nomachi’s work, get a map & directions, view past Tokyo Photo Night photographers.

Produced by: Torin Boyd

My hula article in ANA’s inflight mag

I wrote an article about hula in this month’s March 2004 issue of WINGSPAN magazine which is ANA’s inflight magazine.

It is the magazine’s main article with 10 pages of text and color photos. It is the result of a “hula trip” to Hawaii I made in Nov. 2003. The article includes a personal narrative of my thoughts and experiences with hula, interviews with hula dancers, and practical information such as hula basics, hula history, and hula shows. The photos were taken by a pro photographer.

There were a few editorial disagreements I had with the magazine editor, so there are a few words and expressions that I don’t agree with. Such as the title: “Hawaii: Window to a Culture.” I wanted it to be “Hula: Window to a Culture.” After all, the article is about hula, not Hawaii. But all in all, it turned out okay.

If you fly on ANA (All Nippon Airways) this month, please look for my article! Otherwise, you can probably pick up a copy at ANA ticket offices.

Have a good trip!

Update: I have reproduced the article online, but without the original photos. The photos in the online version were not in the original article:
http://photoguide.jp/txt/Hula_in_Hawaii

“History of Japanese Photography” book review

In fall 2003, I heard through the grapevine that the publisher of this book was desperately trying to get this book reviewed by English daily newspapers in Japan.

I reviewed it in detail at PhotoReviews (see http://photojpn.org/books/hist/japan.html ) in Sept. 2003. I heard that at one major English daily, the book got passed around, but no one wanted to review it. I wonder why.

The book came out in March 2003 and finally we see a book review in print in English in Japan. A book review by Jeff Kingston appeared in The Japan Times on Jan. 11, 2004. See
http://www.japantimes.co.jp/cgi-bin/getarticle.pl5?fb20040111a1.htm

Can you believe how long (10 months) it took for this important book to be reviewed in English in Japan?? I can’t believe that I was the first to review it in English in Japan. Even Sept. (6 months after the publishing date) is rather late…

Note about the Laughing Geisha

I just received the note below about the identity of the “Laughing Geisha” on the vintage postcards I display here:

http://photojpn.org/postcards/albums.php

It sounds like a good lead.
————
Hi, Philbert –
I was browsing your website, again, and noticed that you don’t have a name for the smiling geisha of Yokohama. In 1905, Karl Lewis published a catalogue of the postcards he had for sale, including a section on “The Belle of Japan – Tokimatsu” – 22 postcards of “the smiling geisha”. The catalogue was reproduced in the Oct. 1987 issue of Japanese Philately. I have seen a few of these cards on eBay, although infrequently – one is up right now.

I assume Tokimatsu was her professional name – I read somewhere that she was a waitress, but I’ve seen a couple of rather risque pics of her, too. this may be no more than a nickname, but with enough data points, you may be able to identify her. Smile

Luck! Alan

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