Canon PowerShot S80 impressions

Here I am still using my 2-year-old, already-ancient, Canon PowerShot S50 compact digital camera with 5 megs. It served well, but I have grown increasingly envious of successor models such as the S60 and S70, especially since they sport a 28mm wide-angle lens. Something I really miss on the S50 with only 35mm wide angle.

So now I’m looking to replace my S50, and I was almost going to buy the S70, but then the S80 (pictured above) was announced. Geez, only 1 year after the S70 and there’s already a new model.

But this new S80 is different in major ways besides the 8 meg sensor. It’s actually a totally new generation of PowerShot digicam. Today I went to the chic Canon showroom in Ginza, Tokyo to see and touch this camera for the first time. I was duly impressed, much more than I was when the S70 came out.

The width of the camera is noticeably shorter than the S70/60/50. But the thickness is slightly larger than the S70. The external, black-and-silver color tone and design definitely looks slicker and classier than the S70 and previous models. The left side of the camera has the lens sticking out almost at the camera edge, so there’s hardly any room for your left hand to hold the camera. I think my fingers are apt to cover the built-in flash. I guess we have to hold it by the top and bottom edges of the camera.

The monitor screen is much bigger. This conforms to an industry-wide trend where the LCD monitor on the back of the camera for image and menu viewing is expanding to around 2.5 inches which is very comfortable for the eyes.

At first, I thought I could live with the smaller and normal-size 1.8-inch monitor on older cameras. But after looking at the larger screen on the S80 and then comparing it with the S70’s screen, I immediately felt like the smaller monitor was forcing me to squint. Yep, a bigger monitor screen is definitely better. No wonder Canon is incorporating a bigger screen on most of its new digital cameras both in the compact and EOS lines. (Too bad the EOS Rebel 350D/Kiss Digital N missed the boat and still has the smaller monitor.) I just hope the camera battery is powerful enough to light up the larger screen without running out of power too soon.

Another impressive development is the camera’s movie mode. It can now record movies up to 1 GB or a whopping 60 minutes maximum. And in the Large mode, no less, for much better picture quality. In fact, the picture quality is so good that Canon says that you can take a still from the movie and print it out. The movie mode in previous models was limited to only 3 minutes of continuous recording time and the resolution was low.

Another thing I noticed was continuous autoexposure in the movie mode. In previous models, the exposure was set automatically only for the initial scene of the movie and then locked for the rest of the movie. So if you started recording a movie on a sunny beach and then panned to a dark shady place, the shady place would look too dark because the camera aperture is locked for the initial bright beach.

But the S80 movie mode will autoexpose the movie scene continuously in real time throughout the movie just like normal video cameras do. This is a real boon. Now you can record movies and not worry about different light levels as you pan or change scenes. (I’m puzzled that Canon’s product literature does not mention this major improvement.)

However, you still cannot zoom in or zoom out during a movie recording. The zoom setting is fixed throughout the movie recording. Hopefully, the next model will enable zooming during movie recording. That would be perfect.

I really love the movie mode even on my old S50. It records sound as well, something which you just cannot capture with just a photograph. When you like to shoot festivals like me, you also want to record the music and motions. And when I give a slide show, mixing my still photos with movie clips really spices up the presentation.

I do have a digital video camera and I’ve been using it a lot more ever since I learned how to transfer the movie to my computer, edit it, and save it to a DVD or for the Web. But still, the S80’s movie mode will be a great.

The S80 also has the new DIGIC II image processor. This is a lot faster than the first-generation DIGIC processor in the S70 and previous models. It makes the camera startup faster, continuous shooting faster, and everything feels faster.

Another thing is the new on-screen user interface. Like wow, very slick. For example, when you turn the Mode Dial to change the mode from P (Program) to Movie mode, the LCD monitor displays a large, rotating, dial-like display on the upper right corner to indicate the changing modes. This is great in dark places too when you want to change modes but cannot see the Mode Dial’s markings. After you select the mode, the dial display shrinks and disappears. Maybe somebody from Apple Computer came and designed the screen interface and even the external design. There are some very nice touches to the screen interface.

The most common complaint about the S80 has been that it does not have the RAW mode. Having RAW mode would be great, but for casual snapshooting, JPEG is fine with me.

Another thing is that the camera now uses SD cards instead of CompactFlash. I thought CF cards were small and easy to lose, but SD cards are even smaller and more easy to lose. I’ll need to buy SD cards. Since memory card prices have come down significantly, I don’t mind so much buying SD cards.

I cannot complain about the quick turnover of digital cameras. It’s still an exciting time to see so many major developments in digital camera technology. The S80 will go on sale in Japan tomorrow, Oct. 20, 2005. I’ll let you know after I buy one.

Camera specs at Canon USA:
http://consumer.usa.canon.com/ir/controller?act=ModelDetailAct&fcategoryid=144&modelid=12074

Yodobashi Camera opens in Akihabara, Tokyo

On Sept. 16, 2005, Yodobashi Camera, Japan’s largest and most popular camera store (especially in Tokyo), has opened a large store in Akihabara, Tokyo’s center for electronic goods.

The huge building looks very similar to the one in Osaka. Besides the camera shop, it houses restaurants, Tower Records, and Yurindo Bookstore. Being on a different side of the train station from the rest of the “Electric Town,” the Akihabara crowd is now spreading out more. It also faces the train station’s new Central Entrance making it a 30 sec. walk from the station. Yodobashi will no doubt heat up the competition among stores in Akihabara.

The opening of the new store has been timed well what with the new train line just opened, linking Akihabara and Tsukuba, Ibaraki Pref.

http://www.yodobashi-akiba.com/

Olympus closes camera repair centers

Olympus has closed its camera repair centers in the following cities in Japan:

Sendai, Miyagi Pref. (Closed Aug. 31, 2005)
Nagoya, Aichi Pref. (Closed Sept. 30, 2005)
Hiroshima city (Closed Sept. 30, 2005)

Customers in these cities will now have to send in their cameras to the Okaya Repair Center.

For details, call toll-free in Japan: 0120-084215

Off to Finland in September 2005

I’m happy to announce that I will be in Finland during Sept. 9-18, 2005 as an invited guest at a nature photo festival in a small town called Kuusamo. I am scheduled to give three slide shows on Japanese nature photography. I thank the town of Kuusamo for sponsoring my first trip to Finland.

Also, the Friends of Japanese Culture Society in Helsinki will host a separate slide show that I will give on Sept. 6. I plan to show my pictures and video clips of Japanese festivals. Details below:

A small town called Kuusamo in Finland will be holding its annual nature photo festival during Sept. 9-18, 2005.

They invite a good number of nature photographers to give slide shows and exhibitions. Most are from Europe, and this year many are coming from Germany. They also offer day trips for rafting and bear watching.

This year will be its 10th festival, and they have invited me to give slide shows on nature photography in Japan. My slide shows will be held on Sept. 9, 10, and 11. This is the first time someone from Japan will be giving a slide show at the festival, and I’m honored to participate.

I plan to introduce nature photography in Japan, popular nature spots in Japan, and the works of the following three nature and wildlife Japanese photographers whom I have selected to show at the festival. They have kindly agreed to lend me their photographs and photo books (to be donated to the Kuusamo public library):

Mitsuhiko Imamori (Lake Biwa) http://www.imamori-world.jp/
Satoshi Kuribayashi (insects) http://www5.ocn.ne.jp/~kuriken/
Ikuo Nakamura (marine life) http://www.squall.co.jp/index1.html

Kuusamo is north of Helsinki, about an hour’s flight and almost in the middle of the country slightly below the Artic Circle near the Russian border. It is surrounded by a wonderful natural environment with numerous lakes, rivers, bears, and birds. In winter, it is a popular base for skiiing.

Festival Web site here:
http://www.kuusamo.fi/naturephoto/english.html

Kuusamo Hall (festival venue):
http://www.kuusamo.fi/kuusamotalo/eng/tekniikka.html

Also, the “Finland-Nihon Bunka Tomo no Kai” (Friends of Japanese Culture Society) in Helsinki has agreed to host a separate slide show for me in Helsinki on Sept. 6 since I will be in Helsinki for a few days before flying to Kuusamo. I plan to show slides and movies of Japanese festivals.
http://www.japaninkulttuuri.net/english.html

I look forward to my first trip to Finland. Thanks to the town of Kuusamo for sponsoring my first trip to Finland.

Update: The trip was a great success. See pictures here:
http://photoguide.jp/pix/index.php?cat=97

Latest images for Aug. 2005

In July 2005, I visited Italy for the first time to see the Hiroshima-Nagasaki photo exhibition I co-curated in Genova. I also saw the Venice Biennale where Japanese photographer Miyako Ishiuchi was showing at the Japan Pavilion.

Genova, Italy
Venice Biennale, Italy
Milan and Verona, Italy
Nagasaki Peace Park
Ueno Hikoma Memorials
Gifu Castle
Tsu Castle, Mie
Yoshinogari, Saga
Saga Castle
Kishiwada, Osaka
Shuho-cho, Yamaguchi
Lake Yamanaka, Yamanashi
Yamagata Pref.
Aichi Expo 2005

For a complete list, see PHOTOGUIDE.JP/pix/.

Exhibitions in Italy

Palazzo Ducale, site of the Japan art exhibition in 2005 in Genova, Italy

Ciao!

In early July, I visited Genova, Italy to see a major Japanese art exhibition at the Palazzo Ducale, the city’s grandest exhibition hall being held April to August 2005.

It showed ukiyoe, posters, textiles, and photographs. I was the co-curator of the photography exhibition which showed images of the Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic bomb aftermath.

See photos of the exhibition here:
http://photoguide.jp/pix/thumbnails.php?album=90

I also visited Venice to see the art biennale held every 2 years. The Japan Pavilion featured photographer Miyako Ishiuchi. Mariko Mori was also there with popular UFO exhibit.

Photos:
http://photoguide.jp/pix/thumbnails.php?album=91

I also saw huge photo exhibitions in Milan
http://photoguide.jp/pix/thumbnails.php?album=92

and Verona
http://photoguide.jp/pix/thumbnails.php?album=93

It was my first trip to Italy, and my Italian friends there made it a wonderful trip. I don’t think I can eat Italian food in Japan any more, not after eating the real thing in the real Italy.

Next month in Sept., I’ll be in Finland to give slide shows at a nature photo festival in a small town called Kuusamo. I’ll be taking a little bit of Japan to that Nordic country.

Oyako Photo Contest

Send your family photos and messages!

We’d like to see your smiling faces. We will be selecting family photos and messages to add to the http://www.oyako.org website. Hopefully we can include yours.

How to send:
Attach a photo (jpeg format) to your e-mail and send it to
In addition to your photo and message, write when and where it was taken, along with the names, ages, and occupations of the people in the photo. Also we’d like to know how to contact you, so include your e-mail, telephone, and mailing address (*your contact information will be kept private will not include it on this site or shared with others)

Deadline:Oyako Photo Contest entries must be received by July 31, 2005

Website:later we will introduce our favorite photos on our website.

Prizes
Olympus A Prize:1 prize
E-300 Zuiko Digital Camera with 14-45mm lens
Olympus B Prize: 1 prize
MR-500i, music and digital camera with 20GB HD
Lexmark Prize: 10 prizes
Lexmark X2350 printer and scanner
Edwin Prize: 2 pair of jeans x 5 prizes
Edwin jeans
Hug Prize:1 prize
iLife’05 for Mac computer
Smile Prize:1 prize
Tiger for Mac computer
Family Prize: 1 prize
.mac for Mac computer

More info: http://www.oyako.org/recruitment.html

by Bruce Osborn

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